ACOG and SMFM Recommend COVID-19 Vaccine for Pregnant Individuals

ACOG and SMFM Recommend COVID-19 Vaccine for Pregnant Individuals

CELEBRATION OF WELLNESS NEWS

February 2022

ACOG and SMFM Recommend COVID-19 Vaccine for Pregnant Individuals

Washington, D.C. – The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM), the two leading organizations representing specialists in obstetric care, recommend that all pregnant individuals be vaccinated against COVID-19. The organizations’ recommendations in support of vaccination during pregnancy reflect evidence demonstrating the safe use of the COVID-19 vaccines during pregnancy from tens of thousands of reporting individuals over the last several months, as well as the current low vaccination rates and concerning increase in cases.

Data have shown that COVID-19 infection puts pregnant people at increased risk of severe complications and even death; yet only about 22% of pregnant individuals have received one or more doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In making the strong recommendation in support of vaccination during pregnancy, both national organizations emphasize concerns about significant increases in COVID-19 cases due to the Delta variant and the regional low rates of vaccination in states across the country. Recent data have shown that more than 95% of those who are hospitalized and/or dying from COVID-19 are those who have remained unvaccinated. Pregnant individuals who have decided to wait until after delivery to be vaccinated may be inadvertently exposing themselves to an increased risk of severe illness or death. Those who have recently delivered and were not vaccinated during pregnancy are also strongly encouraged to get vaccinated as soon as possible.

“ACOG encourages its members to enthusiastically recommend vaccination to their patients. This means emphasizing the known safety of the vaccines and the increased risk of severe complications associated with COVID-19 infection, including death, during pregnancy,” said J. Martin Tucker, MD, FACOG, president of ACOG. “It is clear that pregnant people need to feel confident in the decision to choose vaccination, and a strong recommendation from their obstetrician–gynecologist could make a meaningful difference for many pregnant people.”

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Utah Doctor’s Nationwide Study About COVID-19 and Pregnancy

Utah Doctor’s Nationwide Study About COVID-19 and Pregnancy

CELEBRATION OF WELLNESS NEWS

February 2022

Utah Doctor’s Nationwide Study About COVID-19 and Pregnancy

Pregnant people sick with COVID-19 are roughly 40% more likely to develop serious complications or die than pregnant people who don’t have the virus, according to a new nationwide study led by a Utah doctor.

The more severe one’s COVID-19 symptoms are, the more likely they are to suffer serious pregnancy complications — even from common risks, such as high blood pressure, postpartum hemorrhage and other infections, said Dr. Torri D. Metz, a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at University of Utah Health.

Metz discussed the findings in a news conference Monday. Here’s what you need to know.

How does COVID-19 affect pregnancy?
Pregnant people have a higher risk of dying from COVID-19 or needing to be treated in an intensive care unit, previous research has shown. This new research found that COVID-19 can also adversely affect the outcome of a pregnancy, Metz said.

Pregnant people with moderate or severe COVID-19 symptoms — who need supplemental oxygen or to be treated in an ICU — were roughly three times more likely to have serious pregnancy complications than those who had mild, flu-like symptoms or were asymptomatic.

Most COVID-19 cases (80%) were detected in the third trimester, meaning researchers weren’t able to reliably study how the virus may affect complications earlier on in a pregnancy, Metz said. The study was published Monday in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

What is Dr. Metz’s advice?
Get vaccinated for COVID-19, Metz said.

Even though this study was conducted in 2020, before vaccines were widely available to the public, Metz said it provides more evidence that pregnant people should get the vaccine, to help prevent them from experiencing a more severe COVID-19 illness.

Nationally, pregnant people have been less likely than those who aren’t pregnant to receive the vaccine. Metz said she hopes this new study will help alleviate the concerns of people who have been hesitant. “We know that vaccination is safe and effective, and we know that SARS-CoV-2 is dangerous in pregnancy,” she said.

Find where to get vaccinated at coronavirus.utah.gov. Learn more about COVID-19 and pregnancy at mothertobaby.org/fact-sheets/covid-19-vaccines/.

 

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Listeria Outbreak Tied to Dole Salads

Listeria Outbreak Tied to Dole Salads

CELEBRATION OF WELLNESS NEWS

February 2022

Listeria Outbreak Tied to Dole Salads

An outbreak of listeria linked to recalled bags of garden salad has killed two people and sickened 17 others in 13 states, according to federal health officials.

The outbreak is tied to packaged salads produced by Dole and sold under 11 brands, including Dole, Kroger and Nature’s Promise, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday in an update of its investigation.

Dole Fresh Vegetables at the end of October recalled salad products sold in 10 states after a sample tested positive for listeria monocytogenes, an organism that can cause serious and potentially deadly infections. The company has since recalled additional products containing iceberg lettuce produced by contaminated equipment.

Recalled salad products from a Dole plant in Springfield, Ohio, was distributed in Alabama, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Nebraska, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and Wisconsin. All contained a best-if-used-by date between December 22, 2021, and January 9, 2022, according to a January notice posted by the Food and Drug Administration.

Recalled salad products from another facility in Soledad, California, were sold in Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin. All contained a best-if-used-by date between December 23, 2021, and January 8, 2022.

In late December, the company also recalled packaged salads processed at facilities in Bessemer City, North Carolina, and Yuma, Arizona, due to listeria concerns.

The CDC is also investigating another listeria outbreak linked to recalled packaged salads produced by Fresh Express. The agency reports 10 hospitalizations and one death in that separate outbreak.

Listeriosis is a serious infection usually caused by eating contaminated food, afflicting an estimated 1,600 people in the U.S. each year and killing about 260 people, according to the CDC.

Reported By: Kate Gibson, CBS NEWS

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Advice for Pregnant and Postpartum Patients

Advice for Pregnant and Postpartum Patients

CELEBRATION OF WELLNESS NEWS

February 2022

Advice for Pregnant and Postpartum Patients

Pregnancy and childbirth can be a vulnerable time in your life. You may experience depression and anxiety while you are pregnant or after you give birth. And you may not be sure how to get the help that you need to cope with these common challenges. Treatment is available, and it can make all the difference for you and your baby. As an ob-gyn and a women’s behavioral health psychiatrist, I help patients struggling with mental health conditions. I see their lives turn around with treatment. Here is what I wish everyone knew about depression and anxiety during and after pregnancy—including when, why, and how to find the help you need.

Learning to watch for symptoms is key.
Mental health changes are very common during and after pregnancy. One in five pregnant or postpartum women experience depression, anxiety, or scary thoughts. It helps to understand what signs to look out for. Both anxiety and depression can cause irritability, trouble sleeping, and poor concentration.

Treatment can help you and your baby.
If you think you may have anxiety or depression, finding help is one of the most important things you can do for yourself and your family. Treating mental health conditions can help you be healthier and feel better. Treatment also can help you have a healthier pregnancy, help you take better care of your baby, and improve the long-term health of you and your child.

There are several treatment options. They all start with a conversation.
Talk about how you are feeling with your ob-gyn or primary care doctor. Your doctor may offer treatment options or refer you to a psychiatric specialist. Treatment for anxiety and depression can involve medication and therapy. Medications can be taken even while pregnant and breastfeeding. You and your doctor should talk together about treatment options and the best path for you. Support groups and community resources may help too.

You can get through this. Help is within reach.
It can be hard to seek help when you are hurting and vulnerable. Any step you can take to get help can have life-changing results for you and your entire family. Remember, depression and anxiety are real and very treatable conditions. You do not have to suffer in silence.

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Celebration ObGyn Welcomes Dawn Ammirata, APRN to the Team!

Celebration ObGyn Welcomes Dawn Ammirata, APRN to the Team!

CELEBRATION OF WELLNESS NEWS

February 2022

Celebration ObGyn Welcomes Dawn Ammirata, APRN to the Team!

Dawn Ammirata, APRN is a Board Certified Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner, with 20 years of experience in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Born and raised in New Jersey, her inspiration to pursue a career in healthcare stemmed from her grandmother’s example as a nurse. Dawn became a teen health educator in high school and worked for Planned Parenthood while attending college and earning her Bachelors of Science Degree. After working for over 16 years as a Labor and Delivery nurse at St. Barnabas Medical Center, Dawn completed her Master’s Degree as a Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner from Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey.

Dawn is known for being kind hearted and compassionate and always uses a team approach with her patients. Dawn has a passion for nursing and treating her patients throughout the lifespan using an individualized approach and working together to maintain optimal health for her patients.

“I am open and honest. I care about my patients. I listen and create a treatment plan as a team with my patients,” Dawn Ammirata, APRN.

 

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